Slave to the Game

Filling you in on the oddball gaming news

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Sony has finally announced that its PS3 Eye camera will hit European shop shelves next week, bundled with an interactive board game.

The Eye will be sold with game Eye of Judgment for around £65 (€90/$125) in the UK on 26 October, three days after its US release. There it will cost a mere $65 - the equivalent of £32 and €55 at today's exchange rates.

Want to pay only £25 for the Eye? Then wait a few weeks. On 7 November, Sony will sell the camera on its own. The solo pack includes software that lets users take pictures and record video and audio, all of which can be stored on the PS3's hard drive.

As previously reported, the Eye has a manually switched two-mode lens: one for close-ups, the other for "full-body" shots. It also has a 640 x 480 resolution and 60 frames per second (fps), but can reach 120fps if you’re willing to forgo the resolution and drop to 320 x 240.

The Eye of Judgment is a card-based game that uses the Eye to track the movement of interactive cards around spaces on a board, creating various monsters and spells on your telly as a result - think Dungeons and Dragons for the 21st Century.

This certainly isn't the first time we've heard this rumor, but SmartHouse is reporting that Microsoft and Toshiba are working on an updated Xbox 360 with a built-in HD DVD drive. If that were all, we wouldn't bat an eye -- it's gotta happen sometime -- but there are some other, crazier aspects to this version of the rumor that set off some red flags:

SmartHouse also claims that the new box will be Toshiba-branded and have dual HDTV tuners, electronic program guide capabilities, built-in wireless networking, and sport an "MP3 player" dock, which we'd imagine would be for a Zune. That's a hell of a box, right there, and while we've seen similar devices like Sony's PSX, they didn't exactly take the world by storm. Our money is still on a simple bump of the existing 360 to HD DVD, but get ready to hear a lot of about this rumor in the weeks to come.

HPD has issued a crime alert after a rash of burglaries at Game Stop video stores. That's because suspects are breaking into Game Stops all over town, from the southeast side to way out west.

11 News aired some surveillance video of a burglary in progress earlier this year. You could see the crook drop in from the ceiling.

He used a crowbar to open the closet and took off with dozens of games and consoles.

Since we first aired the video, there have been at least 18 more burglaries just like it.

Police strongly believe the same suspects wearing masks are responsible for almost all the burglaries.

Why Game Stops?

Just ask your kids and even some adults.

The games are more popular than ever and they are not cheap. That makes for a prime black market for video games.

Several years ago, 11 News tagged along with police as the busted one suspect who had a room full of stolen video games.

He had more than 5,000 games. All were new and he was allegedly selling wholesale and over the Internet.

But this time Game Stop is not going down with out a fight. Store officials said they have re-enforced all their doors and have updated their cameras.

Like HPD, they are hoping to catch some thieves.

LOS ANGELES (AFP) - A US surgeon working on a "tele-health" breakthrough has devised a way for video game warriors to feel shots, stabs, slams, and hits dealt to their on-screen characters.

A vest designed by doctor Mark Ombrellaro uses air pressure and feedback from computer games to deliver pneumatic thumps to the spots on players' torsos where they would have been struck were they actually on the battlefields.

The "3rd Space" vest will make its US debut in November at a price of 189 dollars. It will be launched with the first-person shooter game "Call of Duty" and a custom-made title.

"It was originally designed as a medical device," Ombrellaro told AFP while letting gamers try the vest at the E for All video game exposition in Los Angeles.

"To give medical exams via the Internet to prisoners, the elderly, those in rural communities and other isolated people."

The medical version of the vest is more sophisticated, enabling doctors sitting at their computers to prod, poke and press patients' bodies from afar and get feedback on what they are virtually feeling, according to Ombrellaro.

That model is pending approval by the US Food and Drug Administration, which wants to be assured that diagnosis made using the vests are reliable.

"You can teleconference with patients but you are missing the hands-on," the vascular surgeon said. "Being able to do that is the last step to tele-health."

A 3rd Space vest that mimics the feeling of G-forces and turning pressures for flight and car games is to be launched early next year, after Ombrellaro's company TN Games finds exciting titles to match it with.

TN Games is based in technology giant Microsoft's home town of Redmond, Washington.

"We've had some Microsoft people check it out," Ombrellaro said.